You Can Avoid Paying Taxes on Your New Car, Although It’s Risky Business

You Can Avoid Paying Taxes on Your New Car, Although It's Risky Business

A few years ago, at a Kruse auction, I sat beside a bald bidder who’d already lost precious portions of his mind over a 2007 Ford Mustang GT-H, the black-and-gold Hertz clone. “I will get this car,” he assured, and he did, but for a sum greater than the Mustang’s original sticker. I asked about applicable auction fees and sales tax. “Oh, no sales tax,” he said. “Montana plates.” READ MORE ››

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Oiled Up: Lucas Dollars Might Lubricate More Racing Than Lucas Oils

Oiled Up: Lucas Dollars Might Lubricate More Racing Than Lucas Oils

From the October 2017 issue

In Corona, California, there’s a massive, wooden, camel-humped building that Sunkist erected during the 1920s in which to squeeze lemons. There, on the lower level of the old citrus-processing plant, Lucas Oil Products now manufactures many of its 272 different additives, fuel treatments, and lubricants. But upstairs are the offices and studios of the Lucas-owned I-10 Race Promotions and MAVTV, likely the widest-spread motorsports and motorsports media organizations in America.

“We were sponsoring tractor pulls and late models long ago. Both series fell apart,” explains Indiana-born Forrest Lucas, 75, who incorporated Lucas Oil in 1989 and, with his wife, Charlotte, owns the interconnected enterprises. “One guy got to doing dope, and the other guy­—I don’t know what happened to him. We picked the series up, cleaned them off, and put them on television.”

That was in 2004. Since then, I-10 Race Promotions has grown its portfolio to eight grassroots motorsports series, each of which now has “Lucas Oil” preceding its name: ASCS Sprint Car Dirt Series, Drag Boat Racing Series, Late Model Dirt Series, Midwest Latemodel Racing Association, Modified Series, Off Road Racing Series, Pro Motocross Championship, and Pro Pulling League. Beyond that, there’s the NHRA Lucas Oil Drag Racing Series, the Lucas Oil NHRA Nationals in Brainerd, Minnesota, the NASCAR Camping World Truck Series Lucas Oil 150 in Phoenix, and support for individual road racers, stock cars, drifters, monster trucks, snowmobiles, aerobatic airplanes, and the occasional Indy car.

Lucas Oil was already providing programming to the floundering MAVTV cable channel when it took control of and refocused it in 2011. “We moved toward motorsports because that’s our background,” says Bob Patison, executive vice president of Lucas Oil and president of MAVTV. “And when Speed went away and converted to Fox Sports 1, we saw an opportunity to step in and fill a need for motorsports programming.”

Lucas Oil’s privately held companies won’t reveal their fiscal commitment to racing, but it’s hard to imagine that the outlook for many of its series would have been rosy without Lucas’s backing. “When we initially took them over,” Patison says, “they all required subsidy from Lucas Oil to survive. A number have now become profitable. There are a couple that are right at that breakeven point. And there are a ­couple that are still limping along that need some help.”

And yet, Lucas’s highest profile marketing move was purchasing the naming rights for the Indianapolis Colts’ NFL stadium for a reported $121.5 million. Lucas Oil Stadium opened in 2008. “There are a lot of people who don’t watch racing,” Forrest Lucas sighs. “I know that.”


Still Waters Run Shallow

Lucas is now building its own venues, among them a stunningly sited off-road course near the Estero Beach resort in Ensenada, Baja California. But the most spectacular is Lucas Oil Speedway in Wheatland, Missouri, which includes a three-eighths-mile dirt oval, an off-road course, and the world’s first purpose-­built lake for drag-boat racing. The latter is some 4000 feet long and about eight feet deep, with shores designed to mitigate wakes to help the water calm after each race. With boats that can exceed 260 mph, that matters.

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A New Era at Audi Sport: Chief Engineer Stephan Reil Is Leaving

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Audi Sport’s chief engineer, Stephan Reil, is leaving the high-performance subsidiary, which previously was known as Quattro GmbH and which has always enjoyed considerable independence from the mothership. Reil was a fixture at the company and perhaps the most prominent face there next to his various bosses, who included Werner Frowein, Frank van Meel, Heinz Hollerweger, and Stephan Winkelmann.

Starting with the RS4, which launched in 1999, the 52-year-old was responsible for every new vehicle project from Quattro/Audi Sport. On his watch, Audi decided to go with—and stick with—a high-revving naturally aspirated V-10 for the R8 supercar, a controversial decision that has worked out well from both image and financial points of view.

Reil also oversaw the expansion of the portfolio to include SUV models. Over the next three years, the Audi Sport lineup will grow from 11 to 16 models. In crafting Audi Sport models, Reil was no fan of diesels, even though several R8 diesel prototypes were built, as well as an RS5 that was used to showcase electric supercharging. Reil also believed that the added power of hybridization did not justify the extra weight, and he didn’t want the company to build fully electric RS vehicles until they could be demonstrably as good as conventionally powered ones.

Reil, who will stay with Audi in an as yet undisclosed capacity, will be replaced by 40-year-old engineer Oliver Hoffmann. Known as a true gearhead, Hoffman gained plenty of performance-car experience at Lamborghini, where he was responsible for the Gallardo/Huracàn/R8 5.2-liter V-10; he also headed engine development at Audi’s Györ, Hungary, plant.

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$199 Lease Deals for October 2017

$199 Lease Deals for October 20172017 Mazda 32017 Chevrolet Silverado 1500 LTZ Z712018 Ram 15002017 Honda Accord2018 Toyota C-HR2015 Volkswagen Tiguan R-Line2017 Mitsubishi Mirage GT2017 Volkswagen Golf Sportwagen 4MOTION2017 Dodge Challenger R/T Scat Pack

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2018 BMW 640i xDrive Gran Turismo First Drive

2018-BMW-6-series-Gran-Turismo-PLACEMENT

The 6-series was among our favorite BMWs. Built for three model generations—two of which have been consecutive, starting in 2003—it was an upmarket and beautiful coupe (with a convertible and later a low-slung four-door derivative) with strong dynamic capabilities. Now BMW tells us its successor for the 6-series will revive the 8-series nomenclature, despite virtually identical market positioning. But that doesn’t mean the 6-series moniker will disappear. Henceforth, it will be affixed to a vastly different car: the BMW 6-series Gran Turismo. READ MORE ››

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2018 BMW 640i xDrive Gran Turismo – First Drive Review

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2018 Ford Focus – In-Depth Review

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2018 Ford Focus in Depth: A Fixture of the American Driveway

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Built on the outskirts of Detroit—for another year or so—and with a well-deserved spot in driveways across the country, the Ford Focus is as American as apple pie. During its journeys, the Focus has accumulated many gifts, and it has bestowed them on the American consumer; among them are lithe handling and impressive fuel efficiency. Unfortunately, these gifts come with some compromises. The Focus is outclassed by larger rivals that offer more passenger space, larger cargo holds, and more modern features. Still, it’s an easy car to recommend, and its two body styles—hatchback and sedan—offer broad appeal. There are even high-performance ST and RS versions and a plug-in electric model, but we review those models separately. READ MORE ››

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Prepare to Get Demonized! A Brief Message To All Dodge Demon Buyers

Prepare to Get Demonized! A Brief Message To All Dodge Demon Buyers

Prepare to get Demonized!

Congratulations on the purchase of your new Dodge Demon. By now you’ve probably signed the Customer Acknowledgment Form, also known as the Demon Waiver. So you already know that the tires shatter on cloudy days and if you ordered it with one seat, you shouldn’t install a papasan chair to fill out the interi­or. We’re sure that you’re excited to run some nine-second quarters, Broseph or Brosephine, but there are just a few more items we need to address before you head out to the strip to sneer down on the pathetic weaklings who bought Hellcats. READ MORE ››

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RC Kaiju! Radio-Controlled Full-Size Nissan GT-R Laps Silverstone! [Video]

Radio-controlled full-size automobiles are nothing new—just ask J.J. Lynch—but as far as we know, nobody’s yet done an RC track day using a full-size R35 Nissan GT-R. Until now, that is. Nissan GT Academy winner and Super GT racer Jann Mardenborough has lapped Silverstone’s National Circuit using a PlayStation controller to command Godzilla’s every move.

The car was outfitted with a suite of servos to control throttle, brake, steering, and shifting, while Mardenborough’s control interface was a bone-stock Sony DualShock 4 controller. Translating the controller’s signals to the servos was a custom-programmed microcomputer. Button-mashing becomes real-world motion! Perched on high in a helicopter above the track, Mardenborough monitored speed courtesy of a display connected wirelessly to a Racelogic VBOX mounted in the car. For safety’s sake, two additional operators were stationed on the course, both with the ability to apply full ABS braking and cut the engine should the situation warrant it.

R/C Nissan GT-R





The result? Mardenborough’s quickest trip around the circuit was 1:17:47, which means he was averaging 76 mph. Vmax during the run was 131 mph, which is a fair bit faster than our old Tamiya Fox would go. The stunt was set up to celebrate the release of Gran Turismo Sport, as well as to fete 20 years of Nissan’s involvement with the storied series of game. GT Sport will see its American release for PlayStation 4 on October 17th.

R-C-Kaiju!-Radio-Controlled-Full-Size-Nissan-GT-R-Laps-Silverstone!-[Video]-REEL

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