The Hyundai Ioniq Is the Cheapest Plug-In Hybrid You Can Buy

2018 Ioniq Plug-In Hybrid

Hyundai has priced its electrified Ioniq models competitively to do battle with green-car mainstays like the Toyota Prius and the Chevrolet Volt, and the plug-in hybrid version that’s joining the lineup for 2018 is no exception. Starting at $25,835, the 2018 Ioniq plug-in hybrid costs just $2750 more than the least expensive Ioniq conventional hybrid, and it undercuts all other plug-in hybrid vehicles on the market.

That attractive base price includes a generous load of standard equipment, including proximity key entry, dual-zone automatic climate control, heated front seats, and a 7.0-inch touchscreen with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto functionality. A Limited trim level is also offered for $29,185, adding leather upholstery, a power driver’s seat, and blind-spot monitoring. Add $3750 for the Limited Ultimate package that pulls out all the stops, including features such as a sunroof, adaptive cruise control, lane-keeping assist, a larger 8.0-inch touchscreen with navigation, and a premium Infinity audio system.

Key differences between the Ioniq plug-in hybrid and the Ioniq hybrid include a larger, 8.9-kWh battery pack (versus 1.6 kWh in the hybrid) and—as the name implies—the ability to plug in and charge up said battery pack. Charging from empty on a 240-volt Level 2 charger is estimated to take just over two hours. The EPA says that the Ioniq plug-in will go 29 electric-only miles on a charge, and that it will achieve 52 mpg combined when running in hybrid mode once the batteries are depleted.  The plug-in hybrid’s electric motor also is slightly more powerful than the hybrid’s, enabling electric-only driving at up to 75 mph. The plug-in hybrid shares the same 1.6-liter Atkinson-cycle inline-four engine and six-speed dual-clutch transmission as the hybrid.

2018 Ioniq Plug-In Hybrid

Those numbers stack up well against the Ioniq plug-in hybrid’s more costly competitors. The Toyota Prius Prime provides less electric-only range, at 25 miles, even though its combined fuel economy of 54 mpg is slightly higher, while the Chevrolet Volt‘s combined fuel economy is rated at a significantly lower 42 mpg, even if its electric-only range of 53 miles beats the Ioniq by a fair margin. The Kia Niro plug-in hybrid, which shares many powertrain components with the Hyundai, offers slightly lower numbers than the Ioniq (26-mile range and a 46 mpg combined rating). Honda’s larger Clarity plug-in hybrid, which starts nearly $10,000 higher, offers an impressive 48 miles of range but a lower 42 mpg combined rating.

Plug-in hybrid shoppers will definitely be spoiled for choice once the Ioniq plug-in arrives at dealerships within the next few months. In typical Hyundai fashion, it appears to offer perhaps the most compelling value proposition in its competitive set.

2018-IONIQ-Plug-In-Hybrid-Reel

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The Hyundai Ioniq Is the Cheapest Plug-In Hybrid You Can Buy

2018 Hyundai Ioniq Plug-In Hybrid2018 Hyundai Ioniq Plug-In Hybrid2018 Hyundai Ioniq Plug-In Hybrid2018 Hyundai Ioniq Plug-In Hybrid2018 Hyundai Ioniq Plug-In Hybridv2018 Hyundai Ioniq Plug-In Hybrid2018 Hyundai Ioniq Plug-In Hybrid2018 Hyundai Ioniq Plug-In Hybrid2018 Hyundai Ioniq Plug-In Hybrid2018 Hyundai Ioniq Plug-In Hybrid2018 Hyundai Ioniq Plug-In Hybrid2018 Hyundai Ioniq Plug-In Hybrid2018 Hyundai Ioniq Plug-In Hybrid2018 Hyundai Ioniq Plug-In Hybrid2018 Hyundai Ioniq Plug-In Hybrid2018 Hyundai Ioniq Plug-In Hybrid2018 Hyundai Ioniq Plug-In Hybrid2018 Hyundai Ioniq Plug-In Hybrid2018 Hyundai Ioniq Plug-In Hybrid2018 Hyundai Ioniq Plug-In Hybrid2018 Hyundai Ioniq Plug-In Hybrid2018 Hyundai Ioniq Plug-In Hybrid2018 Hyundai Ioniq Plug-In Hybrid2018 Hyundai Ioniq Plug-In Hybrid2018 Hyundai Ioniq Plug-In Hybrid2018 Hyundai Ioniq Plug-In Hybrid2018 Hyundai Ioniq Plug-In Hybrid2018 Hyundai Ioniq Plug-In Hybrid2018 Hyundai Ioniq Plug-In Hybrid2018 Hyundai Ioniq Plug-In Hybrid2018 Hyundai Ioniq Plug-In Hybrid2018 Hyundai Ioniq Plug-In Hybrid2018 Hyundai Ioniq Plug-In Hybrid2018 Hyundai Ioniq Plug-In Hybrid2018 Hyundai Ioniq Plug-In Hybrid2018 Hyundai Ioniq Plug-In Hybrid2018 Hyundai Ioniq Plug-In Hybrid2018 Hyundai Ioniq Plug-In Hybrid2018 Hyundai Ioniq Plug-In Hybrid2018 Hyundai Ioniq Plug-In Hybrid2018 Hyundai Ioniq Plug-In Hybrid

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Singaporsche? Five Macans Flaunt Historic Porsche Racing Liveries in Singapore

Porsche Macan sporting historic liveries

Some cars look best in black, others white. And a precious few, like the Porsche Macan, look good in pretty much anything. For proof, we submit this quintet of Porsche Macans shown in Singapore, each fitted with custom-tailored liveries evocative of some of the most illustrious automobiles in Porsche’s distinguished racing history.

The five looks hark back to Porsche’s wildly successful racing endeavors of the 1970s and ’80s, during which the legendary Porsche 917 and 956 race cars were dominant forces at Le Mans, the Nürburgring, and pretty much any other major racing circuit they found themselves on. These include the silver, red, and blue Martini Racing livery; the white-over-blue Rothmans design; the red Salzburg design with its tapering, nose-to-tail white stripes; the classic orange-and-baby-blue Gulf design; and, last but not least, a treatment evocative of the unforgettable Pink Pig 917 race car from 1971, complete with butcher-style “cut” lines defining its individual anatomical parts, just like the original.

Porsche Macan sporting historic liveries

Perhaps you’re already screaming this at your screen, but you may have noted that both in its purpose and its proportions, the Porsche Macan is nothing like the 917 and 956 race cars that first donned these iconic looks, and one doesn’t have to be too cynical to suss out Porsche’s obvious ploy to proliferate the notion that they’re all cut from the same cloth—literally. Yet in these liveries—and certainly from the driver’s seat—it doesn’t seem like all that much of a stretch. No, we didn’t drink the Kool-Aid; we’ve just drank in the Macan’s goodness from behind the wheel on the road and on the track. Suffice to say that, if the motorsports community created a racing class for production-spec compact crossovers, the Macan would likely dominate. (Did we really just write that?)

Each of these one-off Macans debuted in a different location around Singapore, each representing “an integral part of Singapore’s history, and spotlighting the country’s diverse culture and heritage,” according to Porsche. No mention was made why Singapore was chosen over other places in the world with diverse cultures and heritages of their own—like, say, Ann Arbor, Michigan, where the Car and Driver editorial team is based, but alas. Maybe next time, Porsche, should you play this card again with the Panamera Sport Turismo a few years from now . . .

Porsche Macan sporting historic liveries

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Singapor…sche? Five Macans Flaunt Historic Porsche Racing Liveries in Singapore

Porsche Macan sporting historic liveriesPorsche Macan sporting historic liveriesPorsche Macan sporting historic liveriesPorsche Macan sporting historic liveriesPorsche Macan sporting historic liveriesPorsche Macan sporting historic liveriesPorsche Macan sporting historic liveriesPorsche Macan sporting historic liveriesPorsche Macan sporting historic liveriesPorsche Macan sporting historic liveriesPorsche Macan sporting historic liveries

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Fast Facts: The 47,000-Plus-Mile U.S. Interstate System

Fast Facts: The 47,000-Plus-Mile U.S. Interstate System

The interstate highway system was officially born on June 29, 1956, when President Dwight D. Eisenhower signed the Federal-Aid Highway Act. Eisenhower’s interest in the concept was piqued during his tour of the German autobahn system in World War II, when he was Supreme Commander of the Allied Forces in Europe. Initially, he saw its significance in terms of military logistics. Today, almost everything we use in daily life—food, apparel, furniture, appliances, tools, building materials, medical supplies, you name it—has spent some time on an interstate highway on its way to us. READ MORE ››

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One Last Bite: We Drive an Original Dodge Viper RT/10

One Last Bite: We Drive an Original Dodge Viper RT/10

My number-one worry was spinning it into a tree. Second to that, fueled by a quarter-century’s collective bench-racer wisdom on the Viper, was the fear that the car would be a shoddily whacked-together animal—no brains, all muscle. READ MORE ››

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One Last Bite: We Drive an Original Dodge Viper RT/10 – Feature

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Box Cutter: Atlas Coupe Coming, Says Volkswagen U.S. CEO

CrossBlue_Coup233_--1869

The third-generation Volkswagen Touareg won’t be sold in the United States when it goes on sale in other parts of the world next year. Plugging the five-passenger, mid-size crossover hole left by the Touareg’s departure from the U.S. market, however, will be a two-row variant of the boxy Volkswagen Atlas crossover SUV.

Volkswagen’s North American CEO Hinrich Woebcken confirmed to Automotive News that the forthcoming model will trade the blocky looks of the Atlas for “nice, coupe-ish styling.” Woebcken added that the new crossover will be similar to the three-row Atlas, both mechanically and dimensionally. The three-row version rides on an expansive 117.3-inch wheelbase and measures 78.3 inches wide.

Volkswagen CrossBlue Coupe concept

Before the Atlas entered production, the large crossover SUV was previewed by the Volkswagen CrossBlue concept displayed at the 2013 Detroit auto show. Shortly thereafter, Volkswagen took the wraps off the CrossBlue Coupe concept at the 2013 Shanghai auto show. These concepts, both on the Atlas’s MQB platform, sported similar interior designs. In place of the squared-off exterior styling of the CrossBlue, though, the CrossBlue Coupe featured flared fenders with round wheel wells and a noticeably lower roofline.

Although we can’t be sure if the styling differentiation between the production Atlas and its sleeker five-passenger sibling will be as extensive as that between its concept counterparts, we anticipate that the cropped Atlas will draw inspiration from the CrossBlue Coupe concept.

The five-seat Atlas will be built at the same Chattanooga, Tennessee, plant that produces the current model. While Volkswagen is keeping mum on additional details, we expect that the coupelike Atlas will start at less than $30,000 and go on sale before the end of the decade, possibly for the 2020 model year.

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Box Cutter: Atlas Coupe Coming, Says Volkswagen U.S. CEO

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Denied Diesels Driven: Mercedes-Benz E-class

2018-Mercedes-Benz-E220d-euro-spec-Placement

The list of Dieselgate victims is not limited to those who believed the hype and availed themselves of those dirty, cheating Volkswagens, Audis, and Porsches. The scandal also sent tremors through the wider industry. While some automakers have chosen to weather the storm and keep selling diesels in the United States—Jaguar Land Rover has launched its new-generation Ingenium diesel engines, and Chevrolet sells the Cruze and Equinox diesels—others have hit pause. And there’s the strong sense that, at many automakers, the corporate finger is hanging over the stop button. READ MORE ››

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