OMG AMG: We Go Inside Mercedes-AMG Headquarters in Affalterbach

OMG AMG: We Go Inside Mercedes-AMG Headquarters in AffalterbachHans’s HouseLow-Key SurroundingsAMG ShowroomThe Most Affordable AMGsMany Men, Many EnginesWomen IncludedBuilding the M157 V-8They Set the PaceOne Man’s ToolsBoxes of BearingsExtreme BrandingThe Famous Michael KüblerThe Hand to Pagani’s HeartBuilding the 4.0Power and PistonsYoung BloodsThe Silver BeastHWA, Where Mercedes-AMG Race Cars Are BornBirthplace of the AMG GT3An AMG GT3 Comes TogetherSmaller Brake, Bigger BiteThe “Low Cost” Race CarGetting MarriedDon’t Forget the GullwingsRetired Racers Need Love, Too

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2019 Ram 1500 Spied with Minimal Camo!

What It Is: Clad in minimal camo, the next Ram 1500 has been spotted with its new grille largely on display for all to see. The revised unit is hexagonal and perhaps a mite Audi-esque, not quite as dominant a piece as the big-rig maws that Fiat Chrysler Automobiles’ trucks have been wearing since before Daimler’s merger of equals with the Pentastar, back when they were badged Dodge. A pair of subtler, rectangular intakes replaces the overly styled nostrils on recent Rams, while the headlights, with their light-bar DRLs, seem to crib inspiration from the Dodge Durango and the Chrysler 300. Out back, the taillights add complexity and surfacing while also hinting at the 1970s through ’90s D-series pickups’ rear lighting modules. READ MORE ››

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2019 Ram 1500: Nearly Shorn Light-Duty Pickup Spied! – Future Cars

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We Drive the Lynk & Co 01, a Volvo-Based Chinese Crossover for 2020

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We’ll understand if you struggle to get past the ampersand in its grammatically questionable company name—Ford’s luxury brand is right there with you—but the new Lynk & Co 01, a mid-size SUV, could well be the first Chinese car to break big in the United States. That is, when it eventually gets here. READ MORE ››

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2020 Lynk & Co 01: A Volvo-Based Chinese Luxury CUV – Prototype Drive

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It’s a Black-Widow Thing: Why Does Every Company that Owns Jeep Die? – Feature

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New York City Takes Space from Cars, Redistributes to Pedestrians and Bicyclists

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Traffic in New York City can be intense. In Manhattan, where the daytime population surges to four million and pedestrians can outnumber cars by an 18-to-1 margin, city officials recently conducted a months-long experiment on a single block along Broadway. Pavement that was used exclusively for cars was redistributed, allotting more space to bicyclists and pedestrians. The speed limit was slashed to 5 mph. Dedicated bike lanes were added. The city’s Department of Transportation deemed the experiment so successful that it has made the changes permanent.

The “shared street,” near the iconic Flatiron Building, occupies a sliver of Broadway where it intersects Fifth Avenue, just west of Madison Square Park. Viewed from above, it looks like a buffer zone between the leafy park and bustling Fifth Avenue, with tables and umbrellas beckoning pedestrians to sit down and take in the open air.

“We’re seeing cities across the U.S. embrace innovative
-street designs, like shared streets.”
-– Alex Engel, National Association of City Transportation Officials

“When we met with the local community to hear their concerns, we weren’t surprised to learn of the changes they wanted to make this area safer for pedestrians and cyclists,” Luis Sanchez, Manhattan borough commissioner for the New York City DOT. “It’s a space where motorists, pedestrians, and cyclists all travel together safely, with cars traveling at a reduced speed and pedestrians having more options to circulate in an area.”

Jennifer Brown, executive director of the Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership business-improvement district, said her organization has been working with DOT for several years to improve the area, beginning with reclamation of public space from Broadway. The plaza that brought the café tables to the area was built in 2008.

“The actual shared street—this little part of Broadway—was part of a larger project,” she said. “The plaza program was very successful in our neighborhood, and it was very new at the time. I think it was a good idea then to take it a step further.”

New York is like many other big cities across the globe grappling with congestion and with growing urban populations that are demanding safer streets and new mobility options. In Paris, officials have proposed doubling the number of bike lanes and will limit certain streets to electric vehicles by 2020. In London, mayor Sadiq Khan wants to prohibit the building of new parking spaces, and officials are considering lowering speed limits.

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While speed limits in New York have already been reduced to 25 mph in recent years in an effort to reduce traffic fatalities, the shared-street program further lowers vehicle speed limit to 5 mph. Construction on the shared-street project narrowed pedestrian crossing distances on Fifth Avenue and included protected bicycle lanes.

Brown said one of the big challenges DOT faced in altering traffic patterns was to avoid choking access to several large buildings on Fifth Avenue that rely on truck deliveries to support building operations. “Keeping access open to those buildings was very important, but there was so little traffic there anyway, it doesn’t seem to have made much of a difference,” she said. “It’s still early—we just had the ribbon cutting—but so far, so good.”

Shared-street programs have been tried in other parts of New York City, including Lower Manhattan and Jamaica, Queens. Another in Manhattan is planned in 2018 on 43rd Street between Lexington and Third Avenue. Pittsburgh, Seattle, and Cambridge, Massachusetts, have commercial shared street programs aimed at reducing congestion and creating a lively public realm with pedestrian-first designs.

“We’re seeing cities across the U.S. embrace innovative street designs, like shared streets,” Alex Engel, a spokesman for the National Association of City Transportation Officials (NACTO), said in an email. “In part, this is from having a codified resource in tested street designs, which we provide in the NACTO Urban Street Design Guide, which has been endorsed by over 50 jurisdictions in the U.S.”

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We Go for a Ride in the Battery-Powered 2019 Jaguar I-Pace

The I-Pace is Jaguar’s first electric vehicle, and although it’s still months away from showrooms, we got a ride in a preproduction prototype built using the final tooling. Jaguar isn’t doing the final assembly for the I-Pace; instead, Magna Steyr, the contract builders of the Mercedes-Benz G-class and the BMW 5-series, will screw them together in Graz, Austria. Despite not driving the Jag ourselves—that will come later—we did learn a bit more about the I-Pace even as company executives remain largely tight lipped regarding final specs, how much it will cost, how quickly it will charge, and whether Jaguar will be making any infrastructure investments like Tesla. READ MORE ››

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2019 Jaguar I-Pace – Prototype Ride

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2017 Land Rover Discovery in Depth: Roughing It in Suburbia

2017 Land Rover Discovery

Adventure-seeking families across the more well-heeled parts of the United States now have a new option in the crossover marketplace: the redesigned Land Rover Discovery. As under its previous LR4 moniker, the latest Disco is more than just another suburban grocery getter—although it’s good at that sort of chore, too. Need to get over the river and through the woods—or even through the river, for that matter? The Discovery boasts up to 11.1 inches of ground clearance and a wading depth of nearly three feet. All journeys—both on-road and off—will be comfortable ones, with seating for up to seven inside an upscale cabin. The Discovery is not the sportiest, the most capacious, or the most fuel-efficient crossover in the segment, although it does offer a frugal diesel-engine option. But it is a high-tech powerhouse, with most of its infotainment and active safety goodies offered across the lineup and rugged looks that are sure to impress, whether it arrives caked in mud or freshly showered. READ MORE ››

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